May 17th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Jesús oró en el huerto

English Preschool: Jesus Prayed in the Garden

School Age: Jesus Prayed in the Garden

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Caleb Bergman read from the Bible in class.
-Jacob Bergman helped set up for class.
-Brenda Emokah led the class in a song.
-Vanessa Emokah helped a classmate.
-Aubrey Lopez helped a classmate.
-Henry Lowrance led the class in a song.
-Levi Parsard worked on a matching game in class.
-Luke Parsard made some helpful comments in class.
-Maya Pino worked on a matching game in class.
-Angela Solorzano led the class in a song.
-Dayleen Valdes brought a gift for Compassion International and read from the Bible in class and helped translate for a visitor.
-Samuel Valladares worked on a matching game in class.
-In the Kindergarten-2nd Grade Class these kids shared nicely: Jacob Bergman, Derek Gonzalez, Luke Parsard, and Sammy Pino.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

May 29
Last Night of Awana

June 1
Ministry Leaders Meeting

 June 9
3rd-5th Grade Picnic 

June 12
Summer Bible Club Begins


For Parents

Parents’ love for their children can make them do peculiar things. Like staying up until 1 a.m. gluing glitter on a second-grade class project. Or driving 40 miles to deliver a single soccer cleat. Or, perhaps, bribing their teenagers’ way into a fancy college. But one of the weirdest things parents do is love their children more than their partners.

Before you call child services, let me be clear: Of course you have to love your kids. Of course you have to put their needs first. But doing so is also a no-brainer. Children, with their urgent and often tricky-to-ascertain needs, easily attract devotion. Spouses don’t need to be fed and dressed or have their tears dried and are nowhere near as cute. Loving your kids is like going to school–you don’t really have a choice. Loving your spouse is like going to college–it’s up to you to show up and participate.

So why do the harder work for the less adorable, more capable being in your life?

One reason, actually, is for the kids. Research strongly suggests that children whose parents love each other are much happier and more secure than those raised in a loveless environment. They have a model of not just what a relationship looks like but also of how people should treat each other.

Diary studies, in which parents log their day’s activities each evening, have shown that mishandled tensions between a couple tend to spill over into parents’ interactions with their kids, especially for fathers.

Children whose parents are often hostile to each other blame themselves for the fighting and do worse at school, other research has found. In fact, a 2014 survey of 40,000 U.K. households revealed that adolescents were happiest overall when their mothers were happy with their relationships with their male partners. And this is for parents who stay together; the outcomes for kids of divorce–even in the days of conscious uncoupling–are, generally, darker. One of the best things you can do for your kids is love the heck out of your spouse.

If we ever knew this, we have forgotten. When Pew Research asked young people in 2010 whether kids or a good marriage was more important for a happy life, kids won by a margin three times as big as when researchers asked the previous generation in 1997. But betting all your joy on offspring is a treacherously short-term strategy. Cuddly toddlers turn into teenagers, who greet any public display of warmth with revulsion, suspicion or sullenness. Then they leave. Grown children do not want to be the object of all your affection or the main repository for all your dreams, just as you never really wanted to hear their full toddler recaps of PAW Patrol. If you’ve done your job as parents, one day your home is mostly going to hold you, your partner and devices for sending your kids messages that they then ignore.

Parents can get so invested in the enterprise of child rearing, especially in these anxious helicoptery times, that it moves from a task they’re undertaking as a team to the sole point of the team’s existence. Some therapists say this is what’s behind the doubling of the divorce rate among folks over 50 and tripling among those over 65 in the past 25 years: it’s an empty-nest split.

Gerontologist Karl Pillemer of Cornell University, who interviewed 700 couples for his 2015 book 30 Lessons for Loving, says one of his biggest discoveries was how dangerous “the middle-aged blur” of kids and activities and work was to people’s relationships. “It was amazing how few of them could remember a time they had spent alone with their partner–it was what they’d given up,” he told me. “Over and over again people come back to consciousness at 50 or 55 and can’t go to a restaurant and have a conversation.”

The only way to prevent this sad metamorphosis is to remember that the kids are not the reason you got together; they’re a very absorbing project you have undertaken with each other, like a three-dimensional, moving jigsaw puzzle that talks back and leaves its underwear in the bathroom. You don’t want to focus on it so much that you can no longer figure out each other.

Condensed from “Why You Shouldn’t Love Your Kids More Than Your Spouse”  by Belinda Luscombe from time.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
17 de mayo del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): Jesús oró en el huerto

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Jesus Prayed in the Garden

Primaria (Todos): Jesus Prayed in the Garden/Jesús oró en el huerto

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Caleb Bergman leyó la Biblia en clase.
-Jacob Bergman ayudó a preparar el aula.
-Brenda Emokah dirigió a la clase en un canto.
-Vanessa Emokah ayudó a un compañero de clase.
-Aubrey Lopez ayudó a un compañero de clase.
-Henry Lowrance dirigió a la clase en un canto.
-Levi Parsard trabajó en un juego de emparejamiento en clase.
-Luke Parsard hizo comentarios que ayudaron a la clase.
-Maya Pino trabajó en un juego de emparejamiento en clase.
-Angela Solorzano dirigió a la clase en un canto.
-Dayleen Valdes trajo un regalo para Compassion International, leyó de la Biblia y ayudó a traducir a un visitante.
-Samuel Valladares trabajó en un juego de emparejamiento en clase.
-En la clase de Kindergarten-2nd Grado estos niños compartieron amablemente: Jacob Bergman, Derek Gonzalez, Luke Parsard, y Sammy Pino.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

 Mayo 29
Ultima noche de Awana

Junio 1
Reunión de Lideres de Ministerios

 Junio 9
Picnic de 3ro-5to Grado 

Junio 12
Comienzo del Club de Verano


Para los padres

El amor de los padres por sus hijos puede hacer que hagan cosas peculiares. Como quedarse hasta la 1 de la mañana pegando brillo en un proyecto de clase de segundo grado. O manejando 40 millas para entregar un solo taco de fútbol. O, tal vez, sobornando a sus adolescentes para ir a una universidad elegante. Pero una de las cosas más extrañas que hacen los padres es amar a sus hijos más que a sus parejas.

Antes de llamar a servicios infantiles, déjeme ser claro: por supuesto, debe amar a sus hijos. Por supuesto, hay que poner sus necesidades primero. Pero hacerlo también es una obviedad. Los niños, con sus necesidades urgentes y a menudo difíciles de determinar, atraen la devoción fácilmente. Los cónyuges no necesitan ser alimentados y vestidos o secar sus lágrimas y no son tan lindos. Amar a tus hijos es como ir a la escuela, realmente no tienes opción. Amar a tu cónyuge es como ir a la universidad: depende de ti presentarse y participar.

Entonces, ¿por qué hacer el trabajo más difícil para el ser menos adorable y más capaz en tu vida?

Una razón, en realidad, es por los niños. Investigaciones sugieren firmemente que los niños cuyos padres se aman son mucho más felices y más seguros que los criados en un entorno sin amor. Tienen un modelo no solo de cómo se ve una relación, sino también de cómo las personas deben tratarse entre sí.

Los estudios diarios, en los que los padres registran sus actividades diarias cada noche, han demostrado que las tensiones mal manejadas entre una pareja tienden a extenderse a las interacciones de los padres con sus hijos, especialmente para los padres.

. Otros estudios han encontrado que los niños cuyos padres a menudo son hostiles entre sí se culpan por los combates y les va peor en la escuela. De hecho, una encuesta en 2014 en 40,000 hogares del Reino Unido reveló que los adolescentes eran más felices en general cuando sus madres estaban felices con sus relaciones con sus parejas masculinas. Y esto es para los padres que permanecen juntos; los resultados para los hijos del divorcio, incluso en los días de desacoplamiento consciente, son, en general, más oscuros. Una de las mejores cosas que puede hacer por sus hijos es amar a su cónyuge.

Si alguna vez lo supimos, lo hemos olvidado. Cuando Pew Research preguntó a los jóvenes en 2010 si los niños o un buen matrimonio eran más importantes para una vida feliz, los niños ganaron por un margen tres veces más grande que cuando los investigadores preguntaron a la generación anterior en 1997. Pero apostar toda su alegría a la descendencia es una estrategia traicionera a corto plazo. Los niños pequeños se convierten en adolescentes, que responden cualquier muestra pública de calidez con repulsión, sospecha o mal humor. Luego se van. Los niños adultos no quieren ser el objeto de todo tu afecto o el repositorio principal de todos tus sueños, del mismo modo que nunca quisiste escuchar sus recapitulaciones completas de Patrulla Canina. Si han hecho su trabajo como padres, un día su casa solo lo tendrá a usted, a su pareja y a los dispositivos para enviar mensajes a sus hijos que luego ignorarán.

Los padres pueden involucrarse tanto en la empresa de crianza de niños, especialmente en estos tiempos de ansiedad, que se convierte de una tarea que están asumiendo como equipo al único punto de la existencia del equipo. Algunos terapeutas dicen que esto es lo que está detrás de la duplicación de la tasa de divorcios entre las personas mayores de 50 años y la triplicación entre los mayores de 65 años en los últimos 25 años: es una división de nidos vacíos.

El gerontólogo Karl Pillemer, de la Universidad de Cornell, quien entrevistó a 700 parejas para su libro de 2015, 30 lecciones para amar, dice que uno de sus mayores descubrimientos fue lo peligroso que era "el borrón de la edad media" de los niños, las actividades y el trabajo para las relaciones personales. "Fue increíble los pocos que pudieron recordar una vez que pasaron solos con su pareja; era a lo que habían renunciado", me dijo. "Una y otra vez, la gente vuelve a la conciencia a los 50 o 55 años y no puede ir a un restaurante y tener una conversación".

La única forma de prevenir esta triste metamorfosis es recordar que los niños no son la razón por la que se unieron; son un proyecto muy absorbente que han emprendido entre ustedes, como un rompecabezas tridimensional en movimiento que responde y deja su ropa interior en el baño. No quieres enfocarte tanto en eso, que ya no se podrán entender entre si mismos.

Condensado de " Why You Shouldn’t Love Your Kids More than Your Spouse " por Belinda Luscombe de time.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
May 10th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Jesús dio gracias por comida

English Preschool: Jesus Gave Thanks for Food

School Age: Jesus Gave Thanks for Food

This Sunday all the kids join the adults in our worship assembly. Look for our new Connection Bags which are designed to help our children connect with all that is happening in the worship assembly. Your child may use it during worship. Please repack it and return it at the end of the service.

Also, please look for the Children’s Bulletin which has questions designed to engage with the sermon.

We look forward to worshipping with everyone on Sunday!

Recognition

-Caleb Bergman helped his classmates understand what to do.
-Brenda Emokah led a song.
-Maya Pino was helpful in cleaning the classroom.
-Lyla Sensing led a song.
-In the Preschool Class these kids were focused learners: Brenda Emokah, Jaxson Farley, Wesley Lopez, Charlotte Lowrance, Henry Lowrance, Maya Pino, Lyla Sensing, and Angela Solorzano.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

May 12
Mother’s Day 

May 29
Last Night of Awana

June 1
Ministry Leaders Meeting

 June 9
3rd-5th Grade Picnic 

June 12
Summer Bible Club Begins


For Parents

A while back a friend of mine got a dog to help her adjust to the empty nest of the school year, with her last child going off to elementary school. To say a few things changed when Marley arrived is an understatement.

Here’s a series of Facebook posts that followed in the days after Marley’s arrival:

“Welcome to the family! We rescued Marley yesterday, and the kids could not be happier!”

“Seriously… Was last night like the coldest night of the year? Seems cruel for my first night of dog walking!”

“Crate training day 1: Me 0 Marley 1.”

“Trying to get used to the fact that I am now being followed 24/7.”

The last comment makes me laugh. It seems my friend has found a lifetime buddy and will not lack companionship during the day while her kids are at school.

Just like sweet little Marley hates to be separated from his new mom, God hates to be separated from us. He desires for us to abide in Him. When we abide in Him, He abides with us.

If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. John 15:7

The definition of abide is to remain; continue; staying. This indicates continuing action.

So how do we do that? And how do we teach our kids to abide in Him?

Don’t worry, this scripture does not suggest that we should always be on our knees praying or at church every day. After all, we have jobs to do, families to take care of, and school to attend. Instead, we can build simple practices into our day that keep us connected to our Heavenly Father.

Here are just a few ways we can abide in Christ, and show our kids how to remain in Him too

1.Take 5 to 10 minutes a day to read your Bible and a devotional for yourself, and one that is age-appropriate with our children. If your kids are between 4 – 8 years, I suggest you check out The Purpose Driven Life 100 Illustrated Devotions for Children by Rick Warren. Adapted from the #1 international bestseller, The Purpose Driven Life, it helps little ones grow confident of their value in God

2.Choose a challenging life circumstance where you need God’s help and find scripture on that topic. Memorize the verse and pray it specifically for this situation. Parents can make it easy for children by writing the scripture on a card so they can take it with them wherever they go.

3.Pray regularly. We don’t have to wait for dinner or bedtime to offer up thanks and share troubles with God. He is just as approachable and accessible as a good friend.

4.Write in a journal, and as your kids get older, they can start one too. They can record their responses to the scripture verses they read, make a list of the things they are thankful for, and keep track of ways God has answered their prayers.

Consistency is the key to cultivate any relationship, especially the way we abide in God. It’s that consistency that opens up the line of communication between us and our Father in Heaven. This makes a way for God to reaffirm our value in Him.

I rarely see Facebook updates about my friend’s dog anymore. My friend is accustomed to the fact that she will never again be alone in her house. And you are never alone either. God is always with God you.

Condensed from “Moms, You Are Never Alone: Abiding in Christ”  by Kimberly Amici from faithgateway.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
10 de mayo del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): Jesús dio gracias por comida  

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Jesus Gave Thanks for Food

Primaria (Todos): Jesus Gave Thanks for Food

Este domingo todos los niños se unen a los adultos en nuestra asamblea de adoración. Busque nuestras nuevas bolsas de conexión que están diseñadas para ayudar a nuestros niños a conectarse con todo lo que está sucediendo en la asamblea de adoración. Su hijo puede usarlo durante la adoración. Vuelva a empaquetarlo y devuélvalo al final del servicio.

También, busque el Boletín para niños que tiene preguntas diseñadas para participar en el sermón.

¡Esperamos poder adorar con todos los domingos!

Reconocimentos

-Caleb Bergman ayudo a sus compañeros a entender lo que tenían que hacer.
-Brenda Emokah dirigió un canto.
-Maya Pino ayudo a limpiar el aula.
-Lyla Sensing dirigió un canto.
-En la clase Preescolar estos niños fueron unos estudiantes enfocados: Brenda Emokah, Jaxson Farley, Wesley Lopez, Charlotte Lowrance, Henry Lowrance, Maya Pino, Lyla Sensing, y Angela Solorzano.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Mayo 12
Día de las Madres

 Mayo 29
Ultima noche de Awana

Junio 1
Reunión de Lideres de Ministerios

 Junio 9
Picnic de 3ro-5to Grado 

Junio 12
Comienzo del Club de Verano


Para los padres

Hace un tiempo, una amiga mía consiguió que un perro la ayudara a adaptarse al nido vacío del año escolar, con su último hijo en la escuela primaria. Decir que algunas cosas cambiaron cuando llegó Marley es una subestimación.

Aquí hay una serie de publicaciones en Facebook que siguieron en los días posteriores a la llegada de Marley:

"¡Bienvenido a la familia! ¡Rescatamos a Marley ayer, y los niños no podrían estar más felices! "

"En serio ... ¿Fue anoche la noche más fría del año? ¡Parece cruel que sea mi primera noche de pasear perros!

“Día 1 de entrenamiento de jaula: Yo 0 Marley 1.”

"Tratando de acostumbrarme al hecho de que ahora estoy siendo seguida 24/7".

El último comentario me hace reír. Parece que mi amiga ha encontrado un compañero de por vida y no le faltará compañía durante el día mientras sus hijos están en la escuela.

Al igual que la dulce y pequeña Marley odia estar separada de su nueva madre, Dios odia estar separado de nosotros. Él desea que permanezcamos en Él. Cuando permanecemos en Él, Él permanece con nosotros.

Si permaneces en Mí, y Mis palabras permanecen en ti, pide lo que desees, y se hará por ti. Juan 15: 7

La definición de permanecer es permanecer; continuar; quedarse. Esto indica una acción continua.

¿Entonces cómo hacemos eso? ¿Y cómo enseñamos a nuestros hijos a permanecer en Él?

No se preocupe, esta escritura no sugiere que siempre debemos estar de rodillas orando o en la iglesia todos los días. Después de todo, tenemos trabajos que hacer, familias que cuidar y escuela a la que asistir. En cambio, podemos construir prácticas simples en nuestro día que nos mantienen conectados con nuestro Padre Celestial.

Aquí hay algunas maneras en que podemos permanecer en Cristo y mostrarles a nuestros hijos cómo permanecer en Él también.

1. Tómese de 5 a 10 minutos al día para leer su Biblia y un devocional para usted, y uno que sea apropiado para la edad de nuestros hijos. Si sus hijos tienen entre 4 y 8 años, le sugiero que visite The Purpose Driven Life 100 Illustrated Devocions for Children de Rick Warren. Adaptado del libro internacional número 1 mas vendido, The Purpose Driven Life, ayuda a los pequeños a tener más confianza de su valor en Dios.

2. Elija una circunstancia de vida desafiante en la que necesite la ayuda de Dios y encuentre las Escrituras sobre ese tema. Memorice el verso y ore específicamente por esta situación.

Los padres pueden facilitarles la tarea a los niños al escribir el pasaje de las Escrituras en una tarjeta para que puedan llevarlo con ellos dondequiera que vayan.

3. Orar con regularidad. No tenemos que esperar a la cena ni a la hora de acostarnos para ofrecer gracias y compartir los problemas con Dios. Él es tan accesible como un buen amigo.

4. Escriba en un diario, y a medida que sus hijos crezcan, ellos también pueden comenzar uno. Pueden registrar sus respuestas a los versículos de las Escrituras que leen, hacer una lista de las cosas por las que están agradecidos y hacer un seguimiento de las formas en que Dios ha respondido a sus oraciones.

La consistencia es la clave para cultivar cualquier relación, especialmente la forma en que moramos en Dios. Es esa consistencia la que abre la línea de comunicación entre nosotros y nuestro Padre Celestial. Esto hace que Dios pueda reafirmar nuestro valor en Él.

Ya casi no veo actualizaciones de Facebook sobre el perro de mi amiga. Mi amiga está acostumbrada al hecho de que nunca más estará sola en su casa. Y tú tampoco estás solo. Dios siempre esta contigo.

Condensado de "Moms, You Are Vever Alone: Abiding in Christ " por Kimberly Amici de faithgateway.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
May 3rd, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Jesús enseño sobre la oración

English Preschool: Jesus Taught About Prayer

School Age: Jesus Taught About Prayer

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Giandavid De La Hoz has a birthday on May 5.
-Derek Gonzalez has a birthday on May 8.
-Dayleen Valdes has a birthday on May 7.
-The Preschool Class had great participation from Brenda Emokah, Daniel Gomez, Samuel Henriquez, Levi Parsard, Maya Pino, Katherine Ruiz, Samantha Ruiz, Lyla Sensing, Angela Solorzano, and Samuel Valladares.
-The Kindergarten-2nd Grade Class had great participation from Jacob Bergman, Giovanni Delisma, Vanessa Emokah, Derek Gonzalez, Aubrey Lopez, Oliver Lowrance, Aiden Martinez, Sarah Martinez, Luke Parsard, Sammy Pino, Logan Sensing, Weston Sensing, and Ava Soliman.
-The 3rd-6th Grade Class had great participation from Caleb Bergman, Valentino Collado, Vidal Collado, Jonathan Delisma, Moises Delavalle, and Dustin Padilla-Paz.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

May 5
Preschool Picnic 

May 12
Mother’s Day 

May 29
Last Night of Awana

June 1
Ministry Leaders Meeting

 June 9
3rd-5th Grade Picnic 

June 12
Summer Bible Club Begins


For Parents

My husband loves to tell the story of speaking with a World War II veteran almost 20 years ago. Mark was working at Oppenheimer Funds, advising and serving clients with their mutual funds. He got a call one day from a man in his 80s who, Mark quickly found out, had well over a million dollars in his account.

Would you like to know the secret to his financial success?

He put away $25 per month starting from the age of 18. That’s it. Nothing aggressive. No getting rich quick. Just small, slow, steady deposits each and every month.

It reminds me of what my Crossfit coach says during seemingly insurmountable workouts: Chip away at it. Just chip away.

It’s the principle of how you eat an elephant: one bite at a time.

It’s the “daily drip of obedience” that my friend’s mentor admonished him to pursue.

We humans are drawn to get rich quick schemes, to lose 10 pounds by this weekend diets, to the express lane. Like moths to a flame, we love instant gratification, magic formulas, and silver bullets. But we know silver bullets are rare. We know the truth is that real growth comes in one small, right decision after another.

And so it is with bringing up children in the Lord.

Late Easter afternoon I received a photo by text from a friend. It was of one of my teenage daughters leading a Sunday school class of toddlers through the twelve Resurrection Eggs. My friend said the kids were captivated, as she told the story of Jesus’s life, death, and resurrection using the eggs and the little figures they each contain.

I immediately texted another photo back to my friend. It was of me about eight years ago doing the same thing: teaching the resurrection story to some young children, using the same eggs at our church in Okinawa.

Every Easter since my first daughter was born, I have used the Resurrection Eggs on Easter morning to tell my own children, as well as the children of our church, the story of Jesus. Each time I go through the story it only takes about ten minutes. There’s nothing fancy—no video or song or take-home craft. Just some eggs, some figures, some Bible knowledge, and a young, listening audience.

Apparently, my daughter has been listening, because without prompting from me or anyone else, she grabbed the eggs and did exactly what she has seen me do every Easter of her life. My small, steady investment paid off.

This story is a simple one, but it’s one of many, now that my girls are all twelve and above, Mark and I keep witnessing the dividends of our small, but repetitive, investments. It has been in their outspoken refutation of a secular TV show, and their conversations with one another about what modesty is and what it isn’t, and their robust conversation in the car about how Jesus fulfilled the Old Testament laws (all three of these things transpired in the last week).

You must believe me when I tell you that we have never done a whole lot in the way of spiritual formation with our kids. I can tell you honestly that is has just been one small bite every day. We’ve chipped away, unimpressively, at their spiritual growth.

Our routines have usually consisted of the following:

-asking the girls to keep some kind of Bible reading plan that they maintain on their own

-watching 10 minutes of global news together about four times a week and discussing it from a Biblical worldview

-me reading a chapter a day (about 4/7 days a week) from some kind of spiritual formation book out loud

-praying together about 4/7 mornings a week for our family’s needs, missionaries, unreached people, our neighbors, and others

-eating most dinners together, praying as a family at dinner, and discussing my husband’s sermon or what’s going on in the world or in their own lives

-attending church (and serving) together every Sunday no matter what

-Mark reading them a story before bed (about 4/7 times a week), praying with them, and often striking up a deep conversation about once a week

These few and simple tasks add up to mere minutes a day. They are routine and rythymic, but they are not deep or impressive in any way. And, as you can see, none of them happens every day. We aim for general consistency, but know that perfection is not at all realistic.

And I’m seeing now that these small things make an impact. These seemingly insignificant habits have formed some significant things in my daughters: some solid theology, an ability to critique pop culture and media, a capacity to apply a biblical worldview to the news, an awareness of Bible stories and the so-what behind them, an understanding of Jesus’s life, death, and resurrection, and a desire to teach the Bible to younger children.

God, in his mercy, has seen fit to impress one little truth upon another in their lives. Our tiny, but frequent (not perfect! not even daily!) investments are paying off. This is not to say—at all—that my girls have arrived. It is not to claim that they’ve made it to Christian maturity. There are still so many ways I look forward to seeing them grow. This is only to say that God has been faithful to us, in spite of our weak offerings, our imperfect skill, our laziness, our quick-get-this-done mentality at times. 

Like the millionaire on Mark’s phone call, setting aside a little something on a consistent basis has added up over time. Be encouraged. Your children are listening. Your children are absorbing. Your small monthly payment is going to pay off in a big way in the decades to come.

Don’t believe the hype—you don’t need a silver bullet, a glossy kids program, a magical summer camp (though those can be sweet added bonuses). You just need a commitment to put in small amounts of time, consistently over time, and God will take care of the rest.

And then you’ll likely find yourself on the phone one day with a younger parent asking you how you became a millionaire in the spiritual formation of your kids. You will be able to tell them then that it was nothing fancy. You just protected and deposited a small amount each month, you chipped away at it, you took one bite at a time.  

Condensed from “Chip Away at Your Children’s Spiritual Growth”  by Jen Oshman from jenoshman.com.  

3 de mayo del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): Jesús enseño sobre la oración  

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Jesus Taught About Prayer

Primaria (Todos): Jesus Taught About Prayer

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Giandavid De La Hoz cumplé años mayo 5.
-Derek Gonzalez cumplé años mayo 8.
-Dayleen Valdes cumplé años mayo 7.
-La clase preescolar tuvo una gran participación de Brenda Emokah, Daniel Gomez, Samuel Henriquez, Levi Parsard, Maya Pino, Katherine Ruiz, Samantha Ruiz, Lyla Sensing, Angela Solorzano, y Samuel Valladares.
-La clase de Kindergarten-2do grado tuvo una gran participación de Jacob Bergman, Giovanni Delisma, Vanessa Emokah, Derek Gonzalez, Aubrey Lopez, Oliver Lowrance, Aiden Martinez, Sarah Martinez, Luke Parsard, Sammy Pino, Logan Sensing, Weston Sensing, y Ava Soliman.
-La clase de 3ro-6to grado tuvo una gran participación de Caleb Bergman, Valentino Collado, Vidal Collado, Jonathan Delisma, Moises Delavalle, y Dustin Padilla-Paz.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Mayo 5
Picnic Preescolar

 Mayo 12
Día de las Madres

 Mayo 29
Ultima noche de Awana

Junio 1
Reunión de Lideres de Ministerios

 Junio 9
Picnic de 3ro-5to Grado 

Junio 12
Comienzo del Club de Verano


Para los padres

A mi esposo le encanta contar la historia de cuando hablo con un veterano de la Segunda Guerra Mundial hace casi 20 años. Mark estaba trabajando en Oppenheimer Funds, asesorando y sirviendo a los clientes con sus fondos mutuos. Un día recibió una llamada de un hombre de unos 80 años que, Mark descubrió rápidamente, tenía más de un millón de dólares en su cuenta.

¿Te gustaría conocer el secreto de su éxito financiero?

Guardó $ 25 por mes a partir de los 18 años. Eso es todo. Nada agresivo. No se hizo rico rápido. Solo hacia depósitos pequeños, lentos, y constantes cada mes.

Me recuerda lo que dice mi entrenador de Crossfit durante los entrenamientos aparentemente insuperables: sigue adelante. Quítate la barrera.

Es el principio de cómo te comes un elefante: un bocado a la vez.

Es el "goteo diario de obediencia" que el mentor de mi amigo le pidió que siguiera.

Nosotros, los humanos, nos sentimos atraídos a planes de hacernos ricos rápido, a perder 10 libras en las dietas de este fin de semana, a la vía expresa. Como polillas a una llama, amamos la gratificación instantánea, las fórmulas mágicas y las balas de plata. Pero sabemos que las balas de plata son raras. Sabemos que la verdad es que el crecimiento real se produce en una decisión pequeña y correcta una tras otra.

Y es así como se crian hijos en el Señor.

En la tarde de Pascua, recibí una foto de un amigo por texto. Era una de mis hijas adolescentes que dirigía una clase de niños de la escuela dominical a través de los doce Huevos de la Resurrección. Mi amiga dijo que los niños estaban cautivados, mientras contaba la historia de la vida, muerte y resurrección de Jesús utilizando los huevos y las pequeñas figuras que contienen.

Inmediatamente le envié otra foto a mi amigo. Hace ocho años, hacía yo lo mismo: enseñaba la historia de la resurrección a algunos niños pequeños, usando los mismos huevos en nuestra iglesia en Okinawa.

Cada Pascua desde que nació mi primera hija, he usado los Huevos de la Resurrección en la mañana de Pascua para contarles a mis propios hijos, así como a los niños de nuestra iglesia, la historia de Jesús. Cada vez que cuento la historia solo toma unos diez minutos. No hay nada lujoso, ni videos, ni canciones, ni artefactos para llevar a casa. Solo algunos huevos, algunas figuras, algunos conocimientos bíblicos y una audiencia joven y atenta.

Aparentemente, mi hija ha estado escuchando, porque sin que nadie ni nadie se lo haya pedido, tomó los huevos e hizo exactamente lo que me ha visto hacer en cada Pascua de su vida. Mi pequeña y constante inversión dio frutos.

Esta historia es simple, pero es una de muchas, ahora que mis niñas tienen más de doce años, Mark y yo seguimos siendo testigos de los dividendos de nuestras pequeñas pero repetitivas inversiones. Ha sido en su refutación abierta de un programa de televisión secular, y en sus conversaciones entre sí sobre qué es la modestia y qué no, y su conversación sólida en el automóvil sobre cómo Jesús cumplió las leyes del Antiguo Testamento (las tres de estas cosas ocurrieron en la última semana).

Debes creerme cuando te digo que nunca hemos hecho mucho en cuanto a la formación espiritual con nuestros hijos. Les puedo decir honestamente que solo ha sido un pequeño bocado cada día. Hemos invertido, de manera poco impresionante, a su crecimiento espiritual.

Nuestras rutinas han consistido generalmente en lo siguiente:

-Pidiendo a las chicas que mantengan algún tipo de plan de lectura de la Biblia que mantienen por su cuenta.

- Ver juntos 10 minutos de noticias globales unas cuatro veces por semana y discutirlo desde una perspectiva bíblica.

-Yo leo un capítulo al día (alrededor de 4/7 días a la semana) de un libro de formación espiritual en voz alta.

- Orar juntos alrededor de 4/7 mañanas a la semana para las necesidades de nuestra familia, misioneros, personas no hemos alcanzado, vecinos y otras.

- Comer la mayoría de las cenas juntos, orar con la familia en la cena y discutir el sermón de mi esposo o lo que está sucediendo en el mundo o en sus propias vidas.

-Asistir a la iglesia (y servir) juntos todos los domingos sin importar lo que pase.

-Mark leyéndoles una historia antes de acostarse (aproximadamente 4/7 veces a la semana), orando con ellas y, a menudo, entablando una conversación profunda una vez por semana.

Estas pocas y simples tareas se suman a meros minutos al día. Son rutinarios y rítmicos, pero no son profundos ni impresionantes de ninguna manera. Y, como puedes ver, ninguno de ellos sucede todos los días. Nuestro objetivo es la consistencia general, pero sabemos que la perfección no es en absoluto realista.

Y ahora estoy viendo que estas pequeñas cosas tienen un impacto. Estos hábitos aparentemente insignificantes han formado algunas cosas significativas en mis hijas: alguna teología sólida, una capacidad de crítica de la cultura pop y los medios de comunicación, una capacidad de aplicar una cosmovisión bíblica a las noticias, crear conciencia de las historias bíblicas y el qué hay detrás de ellas, una comprensión de la vida, muerte y resurrección de Jesús, y un deseo de enseñar la Biblia a los niños más pequeños.

Dios, en su misericordia, ha considerado oportuno impresionar una pequeña verdad sobre otra en sus vidas. Nuestras inversiones pequeñas, pero frecuentes (¡no perfectas! ¡Ni siquiera diariamente!) Están dando sus frutos. Esto no quiere decir, en absoluto, que mis niñas hayan llegado. No es para afirmar que han llegado a la madurez cristiana. Todavía hay muchas maneras en las que espero verlas crecer. Esto es solo para decir que Dios ha sido fiel con nosotros, a pesar de nuestras débiles ofrendas, nuestra habilidad imperfecta, nuestra pereza, nuestra mentalidad de hacer esto rápidamente a veces.

Al igual que el millonario en la llamada de Mark, a lo largo del tiempo se ha acumulado un poco de algo de manera consistente. Ser alentado. Tus hijos están escuchando. Tus hijos están absorbiendo. Su pequeño pago mensual, pagará en gran medida en las próximas décadas.

No te creas la exageración: no necesitas una bala de plata, un programa brillante para niños, un campamento de verano mágico (aunque esos pueden ser bonos añadidos). Solo necesita un compromiso para dedicar poco tiempo, de manera constante a lo largo del tiempo, y Dios se encargará del resto.

Y es probable que algún día te encuentres hablando por teléfono con un padre más joven que te pregunte cómo te convertiste en un millonario en la formación espiritual de tus hijos. Entonces podrás decirles que no era nada especial. Usted solo protegio y deposito una pequeña cantidad cada mes, invirtió, y tomó un bocado a la vez.

Condensado de "Chip Away at Your Children’s Spiritual Growth " por Jen Oshman de jenoshman.com.

April 26th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Desayuno con Jesús

English Preschool: Breakfast with Jesus

School Age: Thomas Believed

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Jedany Baez has a birthday on April 28.

-Teachers recognized these students for excellent participation in our Easter activities: Jacob Bergman, Cody Carroll, Derek Gonzalez, Henry Lowrance, and Oliver Lowrance. 

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

April 26
Noche de Alabanza 

May 5
Preschool Picnic 

May 12
Mother’s Day 

May 29
Last Night of Awana


For Parents

When I was a youth pastor, most of the students I worked with could not tell me what their fathers did for a living. If they were lucky, they could tell me the name of the company their dad worked for. In rare instances, they knew the general field or job title their dad had. Why is this? Our kids are not paying that much attention to what we do for work outside the home. They care far more about what takes place in the home and in family relationships. You would be hard pressed to find a kid who would not trade a dad with a high-powered executive position who is never home for a dad with a blue-collar job who loves his wife as Christ loves the church and who gives the best of his time and his heart to his family. Our kids will remember who we are at home far more than what we accomplish in our work and activities outside our home.

Can you remember specific things your parents taught you when you were growing up? I am not talking about general principles but about direct quotes. If I gave you a blank sheet of paper, how many direct quotes do you think you could come up with from your mother or father? I think that most of us would be able to come up with a few corny sayings, a couple of jokes, and maybe a snippet of wisdom or two.

. But what if I asked you to write down as much as you could about who your parents were—their character traits, strengths, and weaknesses? You could fill page after page! Why? Because your heart was deeply impressed by experiencing the character of your parents, and you will remember those things for the rest of your life.

Our kids are impacted by who we are, not only by what we say. In Deuteronomy 6, we see that God wants us to talk with our kids often about spiritual things. The message here is not in contrast to that teaching but complimentary of it. If you seek to have a God-filled daily life, you will be talking about spiritual things! A godly lifestyle, prayer, and Scriptures will be woven through your daily routines, and your children will observe this. When your children are fifty years old, they may not be able to remember a lot of specific things you said, but if they are asked to describe your character, they will say, “My mom and dad were always talking about the things of God. He was on the forefront of their minds, and that spilled over into everything we did.” We pray that our children will say that about us and the life that they experienced in our home.

When a child hears the love of God through prayer, Scripture and spiritual conversation and at the same time experiences the love of God through parents who demonstrate grace and love, that child has a great foundation his or her relationship with God. I recently had a conversation with an eighty-year-old woman at a Visionary Parenting Conference. She shared how her father prayed and read the Bible every morning at breakfast while she was growing up. Wow! What a blessing that was to her. Later, she shared with me how she also felt incredibly unloved by her parents. She told me how she remembers her father regularly shaming her, “How could Jesus ever love you when you misbehave like that?” Honestly, it is miracle of God that this woman continued to walk with Jesus once she left that home. God help us give our children not just the truth from your Word but the daily experience of your love!

Condensed from “Impressing a Child’s Heart”  by Rob Rienow from visionaryfam.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
26 de abril del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): Desayuno con Jesús

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Breakfast with Jesus

Primaria (Todos): Thomas Believed/Tomás creyó

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Jedany Baez cumplé años abril 28.
-Los maestros reconocen a estos estudiantes por su excelente participación en nuestras actividades de Pascua: Jacob Bergman, Cody Carroll, Derek Gonzalez, Henry Lowrance, y Oliver Lowrance

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

 Abril 26
Noche de Alabanza

Mayo 5
Picnic Preescolar

 Mayo 12
Día de las Madres

 Mayo 29
Ultima noche de Awana


Para los padres

Cuando era pastor de jóvenes, la mayoría de los estudiantes con los que trabajaba no podían decirme qué hacían sus padres para ganarse la vida. Si tenían suerte, podrían decirme el nombre de la compañía para la que trabajaba su padre. En raras ocasiones, sabían el campo general o título de trabajo que tenía su padre. ¿Por qué es esto? Nuestros hijos no están prestando tanta atención a lo que hacemos para trabajar fuera del hogar. Se preocupan mucho más por lo que ocurre en el hogar y en las relaciones familiares. Sería difícil encontrar a un niño que no cambiaría a un padre con un puesto ejecutivo de alto poder que nunca esta en el hogar por un padre con un trabajo de cuello azul que ama a su esposa como Cristo ama a la iglesia y que da lo mejor de su tiempo y su corazón para su familia. Nuestros hijos recordarán quiénes somos en casa mucho más de lo que logramos en nuestro trabajo y actividades fuera de nuestra casa.

¿Puedes recordar cosas específicas que tus padres te enseñaron cuando crecías? No estoy hablando de principios generales sino de citas directas. Si te doy una hoja de papel en blanco, ¿cuántas citas directas crees que podrías recordar que vengan de tu madre o tu padre? Pienso que la mayoría de nosotros podríamos llegar a algunas frases cursi, un par de bromas y quizás un fragmento de sabiduría o dos.

. Pero ¿qué pasa si te pidiera que escribieras todo lo que pudieras sobre quiénes eran tus padres, sus rasgos de carácter, fortalezas y debilidades? ¡Podrías llenar página tras página! ¿Por qué? Porque tu corazón quedó profundamente impresionado al experimentar el carácter de tus padres, y recordarás esas cosas por el resto de tu vida.

Nuestros hijos se ven impactados por lo que somos, no solo por lo que decimos. En Deuteronomio 6, vemos que Dios quiere que hablemos con nuestros hijos a menudo sobre cosas espirituales. El mensaje aquí no está en contraste con esa enseñanza, sino que lo complementa. Si buscas tener una vida diaria llena de Dios, ¡estarás hablando de cosas espirituales! Un estilo de vida con Dios, la oración y las Escrituras se tejerán a través de tus rutinas diarias, y tus hijos observarán esto. Cuando tus hijos tengan cincuenta años, es posible que no puedan recordar muchas cosas específicas que dijiste, pero si se les pide que describan tu carácter, dirán: "Mi mamá y mi papá siempre hablaban de las cosas de Dios. Él estaba en la vanguardia de sus mentes, y eso se extendió a todo lo que hacíamos”. Oramos para que nuestros hijos digan eso sobre nosotros y la vida que experimentaron en nuestro hogar.

Cuando un niño escucha del amor de Dios a través de la oración, las Escrituras y la conversación espiritual y al mismo tiempo experimenta el amor de Dios a través de sus padres que demuestran gracia y amor, ese niño tiene una gran base para su relación con Dios. Recientemente tuve una conversación con una mujer de ochenta años en una Conferencia de padres visionarios. Ella compartió cómo su padre oraba y leía la Biblia todas las mañanas en el desayuno mientras ella crecía. ¡Guau! Qué bendición eso fue para ella. Después, ella compartió conmigo cómo ella también se sintió increíblemente sin amor de parte de sus padres. Ella me contó cómo recuerda a su padre avergonzándola regularmente: "¿Cómo puede Jesús amarte cuando te portas mal de esta manera?" Honestamente, es un milagro de Dios que esta mujer siguiera caminando con Jesús una vez que dejó ese hogar. ¡Que Dios nos ayude a dar a nuestros hijos no solo la verdad de tu Palabra, sino también la experiencia diaria de tu amor!

Condensado de "Impressing a Child’s Heart " por Rob Rienow de visionaryfam.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
April 19th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: ¡Jesús está vivo!

English Preschool: Jesus is Alive!

School Age: Crucifixion and Resurrection

This Sunday all the kids will be outside for our special activities at 9:45.

Then they will join the adults in our worship assembly. Look for our new Connection Bags which are designed to help our children connect with all that is happening in the worship assembly. Your child may use it during worship. Please repack it and return it at the end of the service.

Recognition

-Caleb Bergman brought a gift for Compassion International.
-Valentino Collado participation in class.
-Vidal Collado participated in class.
-Gian David de la Hoz participated in class.
-Jonathan Delisma participated in class.
-Charlotte Lowrance has a birthday on April 21.
-Oliver Lowrance taught the class a new song.
-Aiden Martinez participated in class.
-Luke Parsard participated in class and explained Palm Sunday to his classmates.
-Logan Sensing taught the class a new song.
-Dayleen Valdes brought a gift for Compassion International.
-The Preschool Class had good participation from Samuel Henriquez, Ashley Martinez, Katherine Ruiz, Samantha Ruiz, Angela Solorzano, and Samuel Valladares.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

April 21
Easter

May 5
Preschool Picnic

 May 12
Mother’s Day


For Parents

I love the whimsy and magic of Easter. I like hiding Easter baskets, picking out new dresses, and gathering a gaggle of kids for a good old egg hunt.

But as fun as these traditions are, they pale in comparison to rich traditions that bring to life the Gospel. As a mom, I treasure the Easter traditions that aren’t just fun or cute, but that remind my family of the power the Easter story — that Jesus took on flesh just to die for our sins and defeat the power of death forever.

Here are some of our very favorite Gospel-centered Easter traditions.

Explain it. This may sound incredibly obvious, but sometimes I miss the forest for the trees. As the Easter season approaches, take a few minutes to have a family conversation about what we are celebrating. Even very young children are capable of understanding that Jesus died… but He didn’t stay dead!

Go “dark” during Holy Week or Good Friday. To honor the solemnity of Holy Week, consider abstaining from social media, gaming, and TV from Palm Sunday to Easter. Replace this time with reading Scripture or an Easter devotional, watching a meaningful Easter movie, or just… (gasp) being silent, and reflecting. A twist on this is to go literally dark on Good Friday — to have no lights on in the home all day. This is a powerful reminder of the day’s somberness.

Celebrate a Seder feast with your family. This deeply symbolic meal is generally celebrated on the Thursday or Friday before Easter. Each food in the feast has a rich theological meaning that you can discuss as a family and even read a corresponding Scripture verse.

Use a set of Resurrection eggs for an egg hunt. An egg hunt is always fun. Inside each egg, your child will discover a part of the story.

Attend an Easter service. When your children join you in a worship service, they have the opportunity to see you encouraging the body of believers with your worship. That is a faith building exercise that can’t be duplicated any other way.

Make Resurrection rolls on Easter Sunday. After baking, these rolls have an empty hole inside, just like the empty grave!

If you are like me, your calendar is packed and your to-do list is long. And yet, celebrating rich, meaningful Easter traditions with our children is absolutely one of the best investments of our time. The days do seem so long for us parents, but the years are short. Make the best of them!

Condensed from “Gospel-Centered Easter Traditions For the Family”  by Jessica Smartt from faithgateway.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
19 de abril del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): ¡Jesús está vivo!

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Jesus is Alive!

Primaria (Todos): Crucifixion and Resurrection/Crucifixión y Resurrección

Este domingo los niños se reunirán afuera para nuestras actividades especiales a las 9:45 am.

Después se congregarán junto con los adultos en la asamblea. Busque nuestras bolsas de conexión que están diseñadas para conectar a nuestros hijos con lo que pasa en la asamblea. Su hijo las podrá usar durante el servicio. Por favor empáquelas y regréselas al final del servicio.

Reconocimentos

-Caleb Bergman trajó un regalo para Compassion International.
-Valentino Collado participó en clase.
-Vidal Collado participó en clase.
-Gian David de la Hoz participó en clase.
-Jonathan Delisma participó en clase.
-Charlotte Lowrance cumplé años abril 21.
-Oliver Lowrance le enseño a la clase un nuevo canto.
-Aiden Martinez participó en clase.
-Luke Parsard participó en clase y explicó a sus compañeros lo que significa Domingo de Ramos.
-Logan Sensing le enseño a la clase un nuevo canto.
-Dayleen Valdes trajó un regalo para Compassion International.
-La clase preescolar tuvo una gran participación de Samuel Henriquez, Ashley Martinez, Katherine Ruiz, Samantha Ruiz, Angela Solorzano, y Samuel Valladares.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

 Abril 21
Día de Pascua

Mayo 5
Picnic Preescolar

 Mayo 12
Día de las Madres


Para los padres

Me encanta la extravagancia y la magia de la Pascua. Me gusta esconder canastas de Pascua, escoger vestidos nuevos y reunir a una manada de niños para una buena búsqueda de huevos.

Pero a pesar de lo divertidas que son estas tradiciones, no se comparan con las ricas tradiciones que dan vida al Evangelio. Como madre, atesoro las tradiciones de la Pascua que no solo son divertidas o lindas, sino que le recuerdan a mi familia el poder de la historia de la Pascua: que Jesús se hizo hombre solo para morir por nuestros pecados y vencer el poder de la muerte para siempre.

Aquí están algunas de nuestras tradiciones favoritas de la Pascua centradas en el Evangelio.

Explícalo. Esto puede parecer increíblemente obvio, pero a veces no miro el bosque por los árboles. A medida que se acerca la temporada de Pascua, tómese unos minutos para tener una conversación familiar sobre lo que estamos celebrando. Incluso los niños muy pequeños son capaces de entender que Jesús murió ... ¡pero no se quedó muerto!

Ir "oscuro" durante la Semana Santa o el Viernes Santo. Para honrar la solemnidad de la Semana Santa, considere abstenerse de las redes sociales, los juegos y la televisión desde el Domingo de Ramos hasta la Pascua. Reemplace este tiempo con la lectura de las Escrituras o un devocional de Pascua, viendo una película de Pascua significativa, o simplemente ... (jadeo) guardando silencio y reflexionando. Un giro en esto es literalmente estar en lo oscuro el Viernes Santo, no tener luces encendidas en la casa todo el día. Este es un poderoso recordatorio de la tristeza de este día.

Celebra un banquete del Seder con tu familia. Esta comida profundamente simbólica generalmente se celebra el jueves o viernes antes de la Pascua. Cada alimento en la fiesta tiene un rico significado teológico que puedes discutir como familia e incluso leer un versículo correspondiente de las Escrituras.

Utilice un conjunto de huevos de resurrección para la caza de un huevo. Una caza de huevos siempre es divertida. Dentro de cada huevo, su hijo descubrirá una parte de la historia.

Asistir a un servicio de pascua. Cuando sus hijos se unen a usted en un servicio de adoración, tienen la oportunidad de verlo animar al cuerpo de creyentes con su adoración. Ese es un ejercicio de construcción de fe que no puede ser duplicado de ninguna otra manera.

Haz rollos de resurrección el domingo de Pascua. Después de hornear, estos rollos tienen un agujero vacío en el interior, ¡igual que la tumba vacía!

Si eres como yo, tu calendario está lleno y tu lista de tareas pendientes es larga. Y, sin embargo, celebrar tradiciones de Pascua ricas y significativas con nuestros hijos es absolutamente una de las mejores inversiones de nuestro tiempo. Los días nos parecen demasiado largos, pero los años son cortos. ¡Haz lo mejor de ellos!

Condensado de "Gospel-Centered Easter Traditions For the Family " por Jessica Smartt de faithgateway.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
April 12th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: La gente recibió a Jesús

English Preschool: People Welcomed Jesus

School Age: The Triumphal Entry

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Sophia Barcenas has a birthday today.
-Caleb Bergman participated in class and made connections to apply to his life.
-Cashton Best participated in class with a positive attitude.
-Alfonso Corro participated in class.
-Brenda Emokah did a great job singing and helping others.
-Dustin Padilla-Paz has a birthday on April 13.
-Maya Pino participated in class.
-Sammy Pino participated in class.
-Weston Sensing has a birthday today.
-Bishop Skinner participated in class.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

April 14
K-2nd Grade Picnic

April 21
Easter

May 5
Preschool Picnic

 May 12
Mother’s Day


For Parents

What is your response when your child is frustrated? Does your child’s frustration lead to your own frustration? Let’s say you’re in a hurry to get out the door to go somewhere and your child is having trouble getting ready, or they’re just not ready to go. How are you feeling? Are you becoming emotionally upset? How might you react to your child continuing to say, “I just can’t get this?” after you have spent 20 minutes trying to help her with a set of math problems? A new research study sheds some light on how the emotional state of a parent affects the emotional welfare of a child.

A research team in the department of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, conducted an experimental study involving school-age children and their parent facing a frustrating task together and found that when parents remain calm, they can help a frustrated child self-regulate. The study soon to be published, “Physiological Contagion in Parent-Child Dyads During an Emotional Challenge,” used electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring of both parent and child to measure their emotional state. Emotional contagion occurs when children unconsciously sense their parents’ emotions.

For the study, each parent/child pair entered a room where the child was given a challenging Lego puzzle to complete, and the parent was instructed to watch but not help their child. During the second part of the session, the pair were told they had five extra minutes to complete the puzzle, and the parent could help. The ECG data indicated the parent’s emotional state influenced the child’s emotional regulation but that the child’s emotional state did not affect the parent.

While this is a novel approach to looking at this aspect of the parent-child relationship and further studies will need to be conducted to verify and further understand this phenomenon, it’s useful to see how the functioning of the parent’s nervous system can connect with a child’s nervous system. This is sometimes referred to as attunement or co-regulation. The parent’s connecting with the child in the second phase helped their child to emotionally regulate, or to “calm down.”

From day one, how you as a parent respond to your child when they’re upset will shape their ability to self-regulate. If a parent tells a child who is crying to “stop crying,” “get over it,” or “it’s no big deal,” the child is likely to remain upset. Yelling at a child or telling him to go to his room until he calms down does nothing to help him learn to self-regulate or “control” his emotions and usually leads to repetition and even an escalation of over-reacting to frustrating circumstances.

Picking up a baby when their crying will lead to the baby to stop crying when she sees or hears her parent. Hugging and sharing empathy with a toddler and providing reassurance when they’re upset helps them to calm down. With older children, you can then encourage them to use words to express their feelings. When parents repeatedly ignore or respond negatively or punitively to a child when they’re emotionally upset, as the child develops, he or she will likely over-react to frustrating situations more frequently and more intensely.

When you’re confronted by a crying baby or an upset child, the first thing is for you to regroup and remain calm. Taking a few deep breaths helps most people. When you can respond calmly or neutrally, you will help your child because they’re unconsciously picking up on your calmness, which in turn will cause their nervous system to calm down. Your baby will feel secure. You will then use the moment to help an older child learn skills such as deep breathing, reframing (looking at the situation in a more positive light) as well as using words to convey their thoughts and feelings.

A parent may assume their child is choosing to cry, yell or stomp their feet rather than use words. What is more likely the case is the child hasn’t developed an adequate emotional vocabulary. A meltdown may be the perfect time to teach your child appropriate ways to state how they’re feeling. Once a child can tell you how they feel and why they’re feeling that way, you can help them learn to problem solve and/or become able to accept some situations even though they’d like them to be different. The more time parents spend helping their child develop coping skills, the less time they’ll spend responding to emotional outbursts.

This will then enable you to help them express their needs to others. It also opens up the opportunity to begin to help your child to attune to the needs of others. Listening to your child does not mean that you’ll give in or grant their every wish, but it does help them to feel accepted and more open to listening to you so you can teach them coping skills including emotional regulation, problem-solving as well as empathy and understanding of others.

Here are a few basic tips:

1. Take a few deep breaths and/or count silently to 10 if you’re feeling upset.

2. Look at your child and pay attention to any emotional cues including body language, tone of voice, and words if they’re using them.

3. Calmly validate their feelings by saying, “I see you’re (angry, mad, upset, disappointed, sad, etc.)”

4. Next, try to understand why they’re upset. If you’re not sure you might say, “Tell me what is making you …?” If they can’t tell you, state your observation by saying, “It looks to me like you are ___ because of ___? I understand how that could ___.

5. With younger children, this may be the time to say, “I’m sorry you are ___” and then redirect by saying, “Oh look at ____. I bet you can ____ with it.”

6. For older children, you may have to be assertive and say, I know that is making you feel ___ but ___ (explain or state the reason their desire is not realistic).

7. In some cases, problem-solving may be an appropriate approach.

8. Taking time to teach basic coping skills for toddlers and older children is definitely in order.

Condensed from “Calm Parents are Better Able to Help Children Handle Frustration” by Robert Myers, PhD from childdevelopmentinfo.com.

EnglishVanessa Pardo
12 de abril del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): La gente recibío a Jesús

Pre-escolar (Inglés): People Welcomed Jesus

Primaria (Todos): The Triumphal Entry/La entrada triunfal

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Sophia Barcenas cumplé años hoy.
-Caleb Bergman participó en clase.
-Cashton Best participó en clase con una actitud de positivismo.
-Alfonso Corro participó en clase.
-Brenda Emokah hizó un gran trabajo cantando y ayudando a otros.
-Dustin Padilla-Paz cumplé años abril 13.
-Maya Pino participó en clase
-Sammy Pino participó en clase.
-Weston Sensing cumplé años hoy.
-Bishop Skinner participó en clase.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Abril 14
Picnic de K-2do Grado

 Abril 21
Día de Pascua

Mayo 5
Picnic Preescolar

 Mayo 12
Día de las Madres


Para los padres

¿Cuál es tu respuesta cuando tu hijo está frustrado? ¿La frustración de tu hijo te lleva a tu propia frustración? Digamos que tienes prisa por salir por la puerta para ir a algún lugar y tu hijo tiene dificultades preparándose, o simplemente no está listo para ir. ¿Como te sientes? ¿Te estás poniendo emocionalmente molesto? ¿Cómo reaccionarias a que tu hijo continúe diciendo: “Simplemente no entiendo esto?” ¿Después de haber pasado 20 minutos tratando de ayudarlo con sus problemas de matemáticas? Un nuevo estudio de investigación arroja algo de luz sobre cómo el estado emocional del padre afecta el bienestar emocional de un niño.

Un equipo de investigación en el departamento de psicología de la Universidad de California, Riverside, realizó un estudio experimental con niños en edad escolar y sus padres enfrentando una tarea frustrante y encontró que cuando los padres permanecen tranquilos, pueden ayudar a un niño frustrado a autorregularse. El estudio que se publicará próximamente, "Contagio fisiológico entre díadas padres e hijos durante un desafío emocional", utilizó el monitoreo por electrocardiograma (ECG) del padre y el niño para medir su estado emocional. El contagio emocional ocurre cuando los niños perciben inconscientemente las emociones de sus padres.

Para el estudio, cada pareja de padres e hijos ingresó a una habitación donde al niño se le dio un rompecabezas de Lego difícil de completar, y se le ordenó al padre que observara, pero no ayudara a su hijo. Durante la segunda parte de la sesión, se les dijo a los dos que tenían cinco minutos adicionales para completar el rompecabezas, y los padres podían ayudar. Los datos del ECG indicaron que el estado emocional de los padres influyó en la regulación emocional del niño, pero que el estado emocional del niño no afectó a los padres.

Si bien este es un enfoque novedoso para observar este aspecto de la relación entre padres e hijos y será necesario realizar más estudios para verificar y comprender mejor este fenómeno, es útil ver cómo el funcionamiento del sistema nervioso de los padres se puede conectar con el del niño. Esto a veces se denomina sintonización o corregulación. La conexión de los padres con el niño en la segunda fase ayudó a sus hijos a regularse emocionalmente, o a "calmarse".

Desde el primer día, la forma en que usted, como padre, responde a su hijo cuando está molesto, determinará su capacidad para autorregularse. Si un padre le dice a un niño que está llorando que "deje de llorar", "supérelo" o "no es gran cosa", es probable que el niño siga molesto. Gritarle a un niño o decirle que vaya a su habitación hasta que se calme no hace nada para ayudarlo a aprender a autorregularse o a "controlar" sus emociones y, por lo general, conduce a la repetición e incluso a una escalada de reacciones excesivas a circunstancias frustrantes.

Recoger a un bebé cuando esta llorando hará que deje de llorar cuando vea o escuche a su padre. Abrazar y compartir empatía con un niño pequeño y brindar tranquilidad cuando están molestos les ayuda a calmarse. Con los niños mayores, puede animarlos a usar palabras para expresar sus sentimientos. Cuando los padres repetidamente ignoran o responden de manera negativa a un niño cuando están emocionalmente molestos, a medida que el niño se desarrolla, es probable que reaccione de forma exagerada ante situaciones frustrantes con más frecuencia y con mayor intensidad.

Cuando te enfrentas a un bebé que llora o a un niño molesto, lo primero es que te reagrupes y mantengas la calma. Tomar algunas respiraciones profundas ayuda a la mayoría de las personas. Cuando puedas responderle de manera calmada o neutral, ayudarás a tu hijo porque inconscientemente está captando tu calma, lo que a su vez hará que su sistema nervioso se calme. Tu bebé se sentirá seguro. Luego, utilizará el mismo momento para ayudar a tu niño mayor a aprender habilidades como respirar profundo, reconfigurar (ver la situación desde una perspectiva más positiva), así como el uso de palabras para expresar sus pensamientos y sentimientos.

Un padre puede asumir que su hijo elige llorar, gritar o pisar fuerte en lugar de usar palabras. Lo que es más probable es que el niño no haya desarrollado un vocabulario emocional adecuado. Un colapso puede ser el momento perfecto para enseñarle a tu hijo las formas adecuadas de expresar cómo se siente. Una vez que un niño puede decirle cómo se siente y por qué se siente de esa manera, puede ayudarlo a aprender a resolver problemas y/o ser capaz de aceptar algunas situaciones a pesar de que les gustaría que fueran diferentes.

Cuanto más tiempo pasen los padres ayudando a su hijo a desarrollar habilidades de afrontamiento, menos tiempo pasarán respondiendo a los arrebatos emocionales.

Esto te permitirá ayudarles a expresar sus necesidades a los demás. También abre la oportunidad de comenzar a ayudar a tu hijo a sintonizar con las necesidades de los demás. Escuchar a tu hijo no significa que va a ceder o conceder todos sus deseos, pero lo ayuda a sentirse aceptado y más abierto a escucharlo para que pueda enseñarles habilidades de afrontamiento, incluida la regulación emocional y la resolución de problemas. Como empatía y comprensión de los demás.

Aquí hay algunos consejos básicos:

1. Tome algunas respiraciones profundas y/o cuente en silencio hasta 10 si se siente molesto.

2. Mire a su hijo y preste atención a cualquier señal emocional que incluya el lenguaje corporal, el tono de voz y las palabras si las están usando.

3. Valide con calma sus sentimientos diciendo: "Veo que está (enojado, molesto, decepcionado, triste, etc.)"

4. Luego, trate de entender por qué están molestos. Si no está seguro puede decir: “¿Dime qué te está haciendo…?”. Si no pueden decírtelo, expresa tu observación diciendo: “Me parece que eres ___ debido a ___? Entiendo cómo eso podría ___.

5. Con los niños más pequeños, este puede ser el momento de decir: "Lamento que estés ___" y luego redirigir diciendo: "Oh, mira a ____. Apuesto a que puedes ____ con eso.

6. Para los niños mayores, es posible que tenga que ser asertivo y decir: Sé que eso te hace sentir ___ pero ___ (explique o explique por qué su deseo no es realista).

7. En algunos casos, la solución a problemas puede ser un enfoque apropiado.

8. Tomar tiempo para enseñar habilidades básicas de afrontamiento a niños pequeños y niños mayores es definitivamente importante.

Condensado de "Calm Parents are Better Able to Handle Frustration " por Robert Myers, PhD de childdevelopmentinfo.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
April 5th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Jesús lavó los pies de los discípulos

English Preschool: Jesus Washes the Disciples Feet

School Age: Jesus Washes the Disciples Feet

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Cashton Best had great participation in class.
-Brenda Emokah encouraged the class with her singing and answered questions about the lesson.
-Vivian Garcia has a birthday on April 9.
-Lucas Gonzalez has a birthday today.
-Will Lasater knew the Bible stories that were reviewed in class.
-Guillermo Lamada has a birthday today.
-Henry Lowrance answered questions about the lesson.
-Levi Parsard answered questions about the lesson.
-Maya Pino encouraged the class with her singing.
-Dayleen Valdes brought a gift for Compassion International.
-The Preschool Class had good participation from Daniel Gomez, Christian Gonzalez, Samuel Henriquez, Guillermo Lameda, Ashley Martinez, Katherine Ruiz, and Samantha Ruiz.
-The Kindergarten-2nd Grade Class had good participation from Oliver Lowrance, Aiden Martinez, Luke Parsard, and Sammy Pino.
-The 3rd-5th Grade Class had good participation from Jaeeiel Baez, Jedany Baez, Caleb Bergman, Steven Carmago, and Dayleen Valdes.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

April 14
K-2nd Grade Picnic

April 21
Easter


For Parents

When you’re making choices as a parent concerning your children and your family, it’s easy to choose whatever is most comfortable in the moment. But a friend of mine gave me a much better criterion for making these decisions. Ask yourself, “What pattern do I want to set for my family?”

Let me give you a couple of examples of how we’ve used this: Camping with children is a hassle. There’s the packing and unpacking. The fact that little kids can’t do all that much that makes this form of recreation enjoyable (can’t hike very far, swim, bait their own fishing hook, etc.). And the fact that they roll around in the tent and make what is already an unpleasant night’s sleep more unpleasant. The trip is a blast for them, but for Mom and Dad? It’s more work than fun. Nevertheless, we’ve tried to go camping at least once a year just to set this pattern from the start: “The McKays spend time in the outdoors.”

Example #2: One of our two cars is a dented 2007 rattlebox of a Honda with over 120k miles on it. I wasn’t crazy about the car when we bought it a decade ago when I was in school, and I still have no love for it. I’d really like to replace it with a nice truck. But, I feel like keeping the car is an important symbol in our family; it sets the pattern: “We don’t replace something just for the heck of it; we use it up until it no longer functions.”

The patterns you set will of course depend on the values you want to uphold in your own family.

I know folks who took their babies and toddlers on international trips — even though toting along this extra “baggage” naturally created difficulties and made things less fun for Mom and Dad — because right from the start they wanted to set the pattern: “We’re a family that travels.” I know parents who take their kids to church even on vacation, no matter the location, to set the pattern: “Sundays are for worship.” I know those where the whole family goes for a run before opening Christmas presents, to set the pattern: “Stuff is nice, but the greatest gift is physical health.”

Asking yourself what pattern you want to set for your family is useful in helping you focus on the long term over the short. A decision can seemingly make the most sense in the moment, but not contribute to the overall trajectory you’d like to set your family on.

The first time your toddler has a meltdown at a restaurant, handing him your phone can seem like an inconsequential decision. But you might check yourself by asking, “What pattern do I want to set here?”: “We use our phones to soothe bad feelings and boredom,” or “We never use phones at the dinner table”?

When your kids are “helping” with chores or “helping” you cook, and doing the tasks slowly and wrongly, and even making more work for you than if you just did the job yourself, it’s easy to step in and take things over. But stop and think not just about the result you want right now, but the result you want a year, five years, ten years down the line. Is it more important to get the chore done quickly, or teach your kid how to be responsible and competent?

My aforementioned friend decided very early on that instead of letting his four kids watch television on Saturday mornings, they had to read books instead. While the rule was hard to enforce when the kids were young, they say, now when Mom and Dad wake up, they’re delighted to see all their children sitting and reading on the couch (and they allow themselves to wake up later, as they feel better about sleeping in knowing their kids aren’t zombied out in front of a screen!).

Asking yourself what pattern you’re setting with a certain decision can be useful for individual choices, but is particularly powerful for familial ones, because within the walls of your home, you’re creating a tiny, but bona fide culture. A culture with its own norms and traditions. A culture that will influence parental happiness, and your children’s lives, far more than the things you try to more proactively “lecture” about. It changes the calculus you use when trying to figure out whether some decision is worth it or not. What may seem like a small, insignificant choice when viewed as an isolated decision, may seem more important and worthwhile — and more motivating to follow through on — when viewed as a stepping stone for things to come, a piece of the scaffolding of your family’s culture, a building block for a pattern-in-progress.

Condensed from “What Pattern Are You Setting in Your Family”  by Brett and Kate McKay from artofmanliness.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
5 de abril del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): Jesús lavó los pies de los discípulos

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Jesus Washes the Disciples Feet

Primaria (Todos): Jesus Washes the Disciples Feet/Jesús lavó los pies de los discípulos

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Cashton Best tuvo una gran participación en clase.
-Brenda Emokah animó a la clase con sus cantos y a contestar preguntas de la lección.
-Vivian Garcia cumplé años abril 9.
-Lucas Gonzalez cumplé años hoy.
-Will Lasater sabia las historias de la Biblia que se enseñaron en clase.
-Guillermo Lamada cumplé años hoy.
-Henry Lowrance contestó preguntas de la lección.
-Levi Parsard contestó preguntas de la lección.
-Maya Pino animó a la clase con sus cantos.
-Dayleen Valdes trajó un regalo para Compassion International.
-La clase preescolar tuvo una gran participación de Daniel Gomez, Christian Gonzalez, Samuel Henriquez, Guillermo Lameda, Ashley Martinez, Katherine Ruiz y Samantha Ruiz.
-La clase de Kinder-2do grado tuvo una gran participación de Oliver Lowrance, Aiden Martinez, Luke Parsard y Sammy Pino.
-La clase de 3ro-5to grado tuvo una gran participación de Jaeeiel Baez, Jedany Baez, Caleb Bergman, Steven Carmago y Dayleen Valdes.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Abril 14
Picnic de K-2do Grado

 Abril 21
Día de Pascua


Para los padres

Cuando tomas decisiones como padre con respecto a tus hijos y tu familia, es fácil elegir lo que sea más cómodo en el momento. Pero un amigo mío me dio un criterio mucho mejor para tomar estas decisiones. Pregúntese: “¿Qué patrón quiero establecer para mi familia?”

Déjame darte un par de ejemplos de cómo hemos usado esto: Acampar con niños es una molestia. Ahí está el embalaje y desembalaje. El hecho de que los niños pequeños no puedan hacer todo esto hace que esta forma de recreación sea agradable (no se puede caminar muy lejos, nadar, cebar sus propios anzuelos de pesca, etc.). Y el hecho de que rueden por la tienda hace que lo que ya es una noche desagradable, sea más desagradable. El viaje es una maravilla para ellos, pero ¿para mamá y papá? Es más trabajo que diversión. Sin embargo, hemos intentado ir de campamento al menos una vez al año solo para establecer este patrón desde el principio: "Los McKays pasan tiempo al aire libre".

Ejemplo # 2: Uno de nuestros dos coches es un 2007 Honda con más de 120k millas y golpeado. No estaba loco por el auto cuando lo compramos hace una década cuando estaba en la escuela, y todavía no lo amo. Realmente me gustaría reemplazarlo con un buen camión. Pero, siento que mantener el auto es un símbolo importante en nuestra familia; establece el patrón: "No reemplazamos algo solo por el gusto de hacerlo; lo usamos hasta que ya no funciona ".

Los patrones que establezca dependerán, por supuesto, de los valores que desee mantener en su propia familia.

Sé que las personas que llevaron a sus bebés y niños pequeños en viajes internacionales, a pesar de que llevaban este "equipaje" extra, que naturalmente crea dificultades y hacían las cosas menos divertidas para mamá y papá, es porque desde el principio querían establecer el patrón: "Somos una familia que viaja ". Conozco a padres que llevan a sus hijos a la iglesia incluso en vacaciones, sin importar el lugar, para establecer el patrón:" Los domingos son para la adoración ". Conozco a aquellos en los que toda la familia sale a correr antes de abrir regalos de Navidad, para establecer el patrón: "Las cosas están bien, pero el mejor regalo es la salud física".

Preguntarse qué patrón desea establecer para su familia es útil para ayudarlo a centrarse en el largo plazo en vez del corto. Una decisión puede tener el mayor sentido en el momento, pero no contribuir a la trayectoria general en la que le gustaría que se establezca su familia.

La primera vez que su hijo hace un berrinche en un restaurante, entregarle su teléfono puede parecer una decisión sin importancia. Pero puede comprobarse a sí mismo preguntando: "¿Qué patrón quiero establecer aquí?": "¿Usamos nuestros teléfonos para calmar los malos sentimientos y el aburrimiento”, o “Nunca usamos teléfonos en la mesa”?

Cuando sus hijos están "ayudando" con las tareas o "ayudandolo" a usted a cocinar, y hacen las tareas lenta e incorrectamente, e incluso hacen más trabajo para usted que si usted mismo hiciera el trabajo, es fácil intervenir y asumir las cosas. Pero deténgase y piense no solo en el resultado que desea en este momento, sino en el resultado que desea en un año, cinco años, diez años después. ¿Es más importante terminar la tarea rápidamente o enseñarle a su hijo a ser responsable y competente?

Mi amigo mencionado decidió muy temprano que en lugar de dejar que sus cuatro hijos vieran televisión los sábados por la mañana, ellos tenían que leer libros en vez de ver la televisión. Si bien la regla era difícil de hacer cumplir cuando los niños eran pequeños, dicen que ahora, cuando mamá y papá se despiertan, están encantados de ver a todos sus hijos sentados y leyendo en el sofá (¡y se permiten despertar más tarde, ya que se sienten mejor si duermen un poco mas sabiendo que sus hijos no son zombis delante de una pantalla!).

Preguntarse qué patrón está configurando con una decisión determinada puede ser útil para las elecciones individuales, pero es particularmente poderoso para las familias, porque dentro de las paredes de su hogar, está creando una cultura pequeña, pero auténtica. Una cultura con sus propias normas y tradiciones. Una cultura que influirá en la felicidad de los padres y en la vida de sus hijos, mucho más que las cosas sobre las que trata de “enseñar” de manera más proactiva. Cambia el cálculo que utilizas cuando intentas averiguar si una decisión vale la pena o no. Lo que puede parecer una elección pequeña e insignificante cuando se ve como una decisión aislada, puede parecer más importante y valioso, y más motivador para seguir adelante, cuando se lo ve como un escalón para las cosas por venir, una pieza del andamio de su familia y su cultura, un bloque de construcción para un patrón en progreso.

Condensado de " What Pattern Are You Setting in Your Family " por Brett y Kate MdKay de artofmanliness.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
29 de marzo del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): La mujer junto al pozo

Pre-escolar (Inglés): The Woman at the Well

Primaria (Todos): The Woman at the Well/La mujer junto al pozo

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Caleb Bergman cumplé años abril 1.
-Elias Osorto cumplé años abril 2.
-Lucas Rosales cumplé años abril 1.
-Dayleen Valdes trajó un regalo para Compassion International.
-La clase preescolar tuvo una gran participación de Samuel Henriquez, Guillermo Lameda, Maya Pino, Katherine Ruiz y Samantha Ruiz.
-La clase de Kinder-2do grado tuvo una gran participación de Jacob Bergman, Alfonso Corro, Oliver Lowrance y Sammy Pino.
-La clase de 3ro-5to grado tuvo una gran participación de Jassiel Baez, Jedany Baez, Caleb Bergman, Jonathan Delisma y Dayleen Valdes.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Marzo 23
Bar-B-Que

March 29
Noche de Alabanza

Marzo 31
Area Wide Singing y Noche de Familia

Abril 14
Picnic de K-2do Grado

 Abril 21
Día de Pascua


Para los padres

El destello de ira en los ojos de mi hija adolescente me sorprendió. Habíamos estado acampando y yo estaba ayudando a su hermana, que acababa de quemarse la mano con cenizas calientes cuando ella enojada dijo que se había lastimado la noche anterior. Cuando le pedí que me dejara terminar de ayudar a su hermana, su ira se encendió. “¡Siempre la ayudas a ella primero! ¡No te preocupas por mí en absoluto!” Se apresuró a regresar a nuestra cabaña mientras terminaba de vendar la mano de Aly. Volví a la cabaña, temiendo la confrontación que estaba por venir. Pude ver cómo se desarrollarían los próximos minutos: demandas de mí, acusaciones crecientes de ella. Tenía que haber una mejor manera de manejar estos ciclos de ira. Nos estaba cansando a todos, especialmente a Maddie.

Una vez que un niño está enojado, es fácil para él permanecer en un ciclo de pensamientos, emociones y respuestas físicas que alimentan su ira. Así es como se ve el ciclo de enojo:

-Un evento crea angustia que desencadena la ira del niño. Esto puede ser algo que otra persona dice o hace, o una expectativa insatisfecha.

-El dolor provoca pensamientos o recuerdos que enfocan la respuesta enojada del niño hacia otra persona. Por ejemplo, puede pensar que no entiendes su vida o que te preocupas más por un hermano.

-Estos "pensamientos desencadenantes" conducen a una respuesta emocional negativa. Su hijo se siente frustrado, rechazado, temeroso o enfurecido.

-Esto causa una respuesta física, como una cara enrojecida, mandíbula tensa, corazón palpitante y puños. A medida que la ira toma el control, es difícil pensar racionalmente.

-Finalmente, se produce una respuesta de comportamiento. Todas estas cosas evocan una respuesta de lucha, huida o congelación.

A menudo tratamos de hablarle a nuestros hijos durante su ciclo de enojo, pero ellos no pueden pensar racionalmente. Nuestros mejores esfuerzos de corregir no se lograrán durante este estado altamente emocional; la dura disciplina puede empeorar las cosas.

Esto es cierto para todas las edades: un adolescente emocional y enojado no puede ser más racional que un niño emocional y enojado. Cuando uno de mis hijos está enojado, el ciclo del enojo debe detenerse antes de que pueda ocurrir cualquier otra cosa.

Cuando reconozco la ira en el momento, mis hijos ven que estoy prestando atención. Y cuando estoy disponible, me piden ayuda. Quieren hacer buenas elecciones; solo necesitan una guía adicional y a menudo están agradecidos por brindarles mi ayuda en lugar de enviarlos a sus cuartos o castigarlos.

Esto funciona mejor que decirle a un niño que se calme. Elegir las palabras correctas en el ciclo de enojo de su hijo puede desactivar la situación y llevar a una resolución saludable.

Cuando un niño se enoja, reacciones fisiológicas ocurren en el cuerpo. Según una organización de salud pública, "el cuerpo está inundado de hormonas del estrés. El cerebro desvía la sangre del intestino hacia los músculos, en preparación para el esfuerzo físico. El ritmo cardíaco, la presión arterial y la respiración aumentan".

Podemos ayudar a nuestros hijos a comprender lo que sucede dentro de sus mentes y cuerpos cuando se activan pensamientos negativos para que no se estanquen en el ciclo de enojo, que puede convertirse en un hábito. Podemos enseñar a los niños a reconocer y detener sus propios ciclos de enojo utilizando las tres R: reconocer, reflexionar y redirigir.

Para ayudar a un niño a reconocer los pensamientos desencadenantes, escriba una lista de pensamientos desencadenantes en un pedazo de papel y revíselos regularmente con su hijo. Algunos ejemplos son: "A ella no le importa", "Esto no es justo" y "Nadie me respeta".

Si su hijo no puede identificar los pensamientos desencadenantes, puede ayudar diciendo algo como: "Me he dado cuenta de que cuando piensa que no te estoy escuchando, realmente te enojas conmigo". Trate de observar patrones que su hijo aún no reconoce, y luego ayúdelo.

Luego, enséñale a tu hijo a revisar sus pensamientos. Por ejemplo, cuando está teniendo una respuesta emocional, anímelo a evaluar si los pensamientos en su mente son verdaderos. Cuando un niño aprende a evaluar sus pensamientos de esta manera, puede cambiarlos mejor.

El siguiente paso es reemplazar el pensamiento defectuoso con la verdad, tal como leemos en Filipenses 4:8. Reemplazar los pensamientos negativos con pensamientos de empoderamiento requiere algo de práctica. Ayude a su hijo a enfocarse en la verdad al enumerar las contrapartes de los pensamientos desencadenantes que ha escrito. Por ejemplo, "Sé que mi mamá me ama", "Dios está conmigo en todas las circunstancias" y "Puedo poner un ejemplo para los demás".

Cuando nuestros hijos aprenden a atrapar, controlar y cambiar sus pensamientos desencadenantes, pueden evitar que estos pensamientos negativos se conviertan en emociones amargas y arrebatos. A medida que los ayudamos a redirigir los pensamientos desencadenantes a pensamientos veraces, los equipamos para detener el ciclo de la ira.

Condensado de " How to Stop Your Child’s Angry Cycle " por Tricia Goyer de focusonthefamily.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
March 29th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Jesús y Zaqueo

English Preschool: Jesus and Zacchaeus

School Age: Jesus and Zacchaeus

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Caleb Bergman has a birthday on April 1.
-Elias Osorto has a birthday on April 2.
-Lucas Rosales has a birthday on April 1.
-Dayleen Valdes brought a gift for Compassion International.
-The Preschool Class had good participation from Samuel Henriquez, Guillermo Lameda, Maya Pino, Katherine Ruiz and Samantha Ruiz.
-The Kindergarten-2nd Grade Class had good participation from Jacob Bergman, Alfonso Corro, Oliver Lowrance, and Sammy Pino
-The 3rd-5th Grade Class had good participation from Jassiel Baez, Jedany Baez, Caleb Bergman, Jonathan Delisma, and Dayleen Valdes.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

March 29
Noche de Alabanza

March 31
Area Wide Singing and Family Night

April 14
K-2nd Grade Picnic

April 21
Easter


For Parents

The flash of anger in my tween daughter’s eyes surprised me. We'd been camping, and I was helping her sister who had just burned her hand on hot ash when she angrily said that she had hurt herself the night before. When I asked her to let me finish helping her sister, her anger flared. “You always help her first! You don't care for me at all!” She rushed back to our cabin as I finished bandaging Aly’s hand.I walked back to the cabin, dreading the confrontation ahead. I could see how the next few minutes would play out: demands from me, mounting accusations from her. There had to be a better way to manage these cycles of anger. It was making all of us weary, especially Maddie.

Once a child is angry, it's easy for him to stay in a cycle of thoughts, emotions and physical responses that feed his rage. Here’s what the angry cycle looks like:

-An event creates distress that sets off the child's anger. This can be something another person says or does, or an unmet expectation.

-The pain triggers thoughts or memories that focus the child’s angry response on someone else. For example, he may think you don’t understand his life or that you care more about a sibling.

-These “trigger thoughts” lead to a negative emotional response. Your child feels frustrated, rejected, fearful or enraged.

-This causes a physical response, such as a flushed face, tense jaw, pounding heart and clenched fists. As anger takes control, it is difficult to think rationally.

-Finally, a behavioral response occurs. All these things evoke a fight, flight or freeze response.

We often try to lecture our children during their angry cycle, but they cannot think rationally. Our best efforts at correction will not get through during this highly emotional state; harsh discipline can make things worse.

This is true for all ages: An emotional, angry teen can't be any more rational than an emotional, angry toddler. When one of my children is angry, the angry cycle must stop before anything else can happen.

When I acknowledge anger in the moment, my kids see that I'm paying attention. And when I make myself available, they turn to me for help. They want to make good choices; they just need extra guidance, and are often grateful for my offer to help instead of sending them to their rooms or giving them consequences.

This works better than telling a child to calm down. Choosing the right words in your child's angry cycle can defuse the situation and lead to healthy resolution.

When a child gets angry, physical reactions are occurring in the body. According to a public health organization, "The body is flooded with stress hormones. The brain shunts blood away from the gut and towards the muscles, in preparation for physical exertion. Heart rate, blood pressure and respiration increase.”

We can help our kids understand what's happening inside their minds and bodies when negative thoughts are triggered so that they don't get caught up in the angry cycle, which can become a habit. We can teach children to recognize and stop their own angry cycles using the three R's: recognize, reflect and redirect.

To help a child recognize trigger thoughts, write a list of trigger thoughts on a piece of paper and review them regularly with your child. Some examples are: "She doesn't care," "This isn't fair," and "Nobody respects me."

If your child is unable to identify trigger thoughts, you can help by saying something like, "I've noticed that when you think I'm not listening to you, you get really angry with me." Try to observe patterns that your child doesn't yet recognize, and then help him.

Next, teach your child to check his thoughts. For example, when he is having an emotional response, encourage him to evaluate whether the thoughts in his mind are true. When a child learns to evaluate her thoughts in this way, she is better able to change them.

The next step is to replace the faulty thought with the truth as we read about in Philippians 4:8. Replacing negative thoughts with empowering ones requires some practice. Help your child focus on truth by listing counterstatements to the trigger thoughts you've written down. For example, "I know Mom loves me," "God is with me in all circumstances" and "I can set an example for others."

When our kids learn how to catch, check and change their trigger thoughts, they are better able to keep these negative thoughts from growing into bitter emotions and angry outbursts. As we help them redirect trigger thoughts to truthful thoughts, we equip them to stop the cycle of anger.

Condensed from “How to Stop Your Child’s Angry Cycle”  by Tricia Goyer from focusonthefamily.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
22 de marzo del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): Jesús y Zaqueo

Pre-escolar (Inglés): Jesus and Zacchaeus

Primaria (Todos): Jesus and Zacchaeus/Jesús y Zaqueo

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Elijah Davis participó en clase.
-Gio Delisma mostró un gran conocimiento de la Biblia en clase.
-Brenda Emokah contestó preguntas en clase.
-Nicole Leon cumplé años hoy.
-Aubrey Lopez ayudó a un nuevo amigo a sentirse bienvenido.
-Henry Lowrance contestó preguntas en clase.
-Liam Parsard cumplé años hoy.
-Valentina Rosalaes cumplé años marzo 28.
-Lyla Sensing dirigió a la clase en un canto.
-La clase Preescolar tuvo una buena participación de Samuel Henriquez, Ashley Martinez, Katherine Ruiz, Samantha Ruiz, y Samuel Valladares.
-La clase de 3ro – 5to grado tuvo una participación de parte de: Jassiel Baez, Caleb Bergman, y Jonathan Delisma.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Marzo 23
Bar-B-Que

Marzo 27
NO AWANA durante Vacaciones de primavera

March 29
Noche de Alabanza

Marzo 31
Area Wide Singing y Noche de Familia

Abril 14
Picnic de K-2do Grado

 Abril 21
Día de Pascua


Para los padres

Mi red social estaba repleta de conversaciones sobre Momo, el espeluznante personaje de Internet que circulaba en las redes sociales.

Los padres se han estado advirtiendo mutuamente que Momo está apareciendo en los videos de YouTube para niños y en varias aplicaciones de mensajería, instruyendo a los niños a realizar retos peligrosos o incluso suicidándose.

Escuché por primera vez de avistamientos de Momo el verano pasado. Fue de lo que todos hablaron durante una o dos semanas, y luego, durante meses, la "amenaza" pareció desaparecer. Ahora, sin embargo, Momo está de vuelta. Las mamás y los papás preocupados están recurriendo a las redes sociales para advertirse entre sí para proteger a sus hijos.

Pero, resulta que no hay evidencia real de que el Reto de Momo realmente exista. YouTube, las escuelas y las agencias policiales de todo el mundo creen que todo es un engaño viral, una leyenda urbana perpetuada por los padres que continúan repitiendo las noticias.

Si bien Momo podría no ser una amenaza tan grande como se creé, la preocupación que ha despertado entre los padres no es necesariamente algo malo. Internet puede, de hecho, ser un lugar peligroso. Claro que podemos poner todos los filtros parentales que queremos, pero eso no significa que podamos hacernos de la vista gorda a lo que nuestros hijos están haciendo en línea.

La circulación del Reto de Momo es un buen recordatorio de que debemos estar atentos cuando se trata de lo que nuestros niños están haciendo en línea.

Aquí hay seis pasos que el Family Online Safety Institute recomienda tomar para ser un buen padre digital:

1. Hable con sus hijos. Su hijo todavía está aprendiendo a tomar buenas decisiones por su cuenta, ya tengan 3 o 17 años.

Hable con ellos temprano, y con frecuencia, sobre la presión de sus compañeros y por qué deben resistirse. Sé abierto y directo. Recuérdales que nunca deben hacer nada con lo que no se sientan cómodos: en línea o fuera de línea. Hágales saber que le digan si alguien les pide que hagan algo que creen que está mal y que no hablen con extraños en línea. Con toda la locura del mundo en estos días, realmente ¡debes recordarles esto lo suficiente!

2. Edúcate a ti mismo. ¿No estás familiarizado con el juego que tus hijos aman? ¡Aprende a jugarlo! ¿Escuchas a tus hijos hablar sobre una nueva aplicación de redes sociales? ¡Aprende como usarla! Busque en línea cualquier cosa que no entienda: hay una gran cantidad de información sobre casi todas las aplicaciones y juegos creados. Es posible que descubra que disfruta de los mismos juegos o aplicaciones que sus hijos, ¡y puede abrir nuevas líneas de comunicación entre ustedes!

3. Usa los controles parentales. Casi todas las plataformas en línea ofrecen controles parentales para ayudarlo a restringir los tipos de contenido que su hijo puede ver. Utilícelos y revíselos periódicamente para asegurarse de que estén funcionando.

4. Establezca límites de tiempo y uso razonables. Establezca reglas sobre cuánto tiempo de pantalla es aceptable y qué se permite y qué no pueden hacer sus hijos en línea.

El Family Online Safety Institute sugiere establecer un contrato familiar que incluya sanciones si no se cumplen los límites acordados.

5. Estar presente. Como lo expresó el Family Online Safety Institute, "Amistad y seguir, pero no aceche". ¿Qué significa eso? Significa que, si su hijo tiene edad suficiente para las redes sociales, debe "hacerlos" amigos, pero respetar su espacio, ¡y no ser el padre que comenta en cada foto! También debe hablar con su hijo sobre lo que es apropiado y lo que no es apropiado para compartir en línea, desde información personal hasta opciones de fotos.

6. ¡Sé un buen modelo a seguir! Puedes hablar con los niños todo lo que quieras sobre la limitación del tiempo de pantalla, pero si te ven en tus dispositivos digitales todo el tiempo ... bueno, estás diciendo una cosa, ¡pero sin duda estás enviando un mensaje diferente! Cuando sea el momento de que los niños se desenchufen, usted también debería hacerlo. Encuentre algo que puedan hacer juntos: salgan a caminar, jueguen un juego o incluso recuéstense en el sofá para leer un libro.

Momo podría ser un no-no, ¡pero eso no significa que debamos estar menos atentos e involucrados en lo que nuestros niños están haciendo en línea!

Condensado de " Hoax or Not, Momo is a Reminder to Watch What Our Kids are Doing Online" por Elizabeth Patton de macaronikid.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
March 8th, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: El buen samaritano

English Preschool: The Good Samaritan

School Age: The Good Samaritan

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Nicole Leon was a good helper.
-Aubrey Lopez was a good helper.
-Oliver Lowrance remembered to tell his family about the daily Bible reading plan.
-Samuel Henriquez did a great job on a class project.
-Levi Parsard has a birthday on March 12.
-Levi Parsard led songs for the class.
-Maya Pino was a great helper.
-Katherine Ruiz participated in class.
-Lyla Sensing led songs for the class.
-Dayleen Valdes brought a gift for Compassion International.
-Samuel Valladares did a great job on a class project.
-These students in the Preschool Class answered questions about the lesson: Henry Lowrance, Levi Parsard, Maya Pino, and Lyla Sensing.
-These students in the Kindergarten-2nd Grade Class worked as a team: Giovanni Delisma, Oliver Lowrance, Aiden Martinez, Luke Parsard, Logan Sensing, and Weston Sensing.
-These students in the 3rd-5th Grade Class read from the Bible: Jassiel Baez, Jedany Baez, Jonathan Delisma, and Dayleen Valdes.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

March 10
3rd-5th Grade Picnic
Spring Forward

 March 23
Bar-B-Que

 March 27
NO AWANA during Spring Break

March 29
Noche de Alabanza

March 31
Area Wide Singing and Family Night


For Parents

The tradition of Lent and fasting (or giving something up) is not traditional for most evangelical Christians, there is a growing interest among many believers to use these weeks before Easter to draw closer to Christ, remember His sacrifice, and ready our hearts to celebrate His Resurrection! In her popular book 40 Days of Decrease, Christian author Alicia Britt Chole invites us to consider Lent as a kickoff to a season of decrease, a different type of fast. 40 Days of Decrease invites you to thin your life to thicken your communion with God.

As Chole writes, “Our focus is uncluttering our hearts from the stuff that weighs us down and blocks our, and others’ view of Jesus. Because much of the reason we’re here on earth is to see Jesus and have others see Him through us.” Be blessed by this exclusive excerpt…

*

“He must increase, but I must decrease.” – John the Baptist (John 3:30 NKJV)

Decrease is a spiritual necessity. John the Baptist was the first among Jesus’ followers to grasp its counter-cultural power. John’s understanding of “less is more” was spiritually profound. Gabriel had announced John’s life-calling to Zechariah before John was even conceived: John was the one who, “in the spirit and power of Elijah . . . [would] make ready a people prepared for the Lord” (Luke 1:17).

In many ways, John lived a Lenten lifestyle 365 days a year. His diet was narrow, his possessions were minimal, and his focus was eternal. But decrease for John was less about assets and more about attention. His longing was to draw his generation’s attention and allegiance to the Messiah. From John’s perspective, the true value of people seeing him was that people would then be positioned to see through him and gaze at Jesus. By willingly decreasing, John increased others’ view of the Savior.

Attention is not innately evil. It becomes evil when used as a self-serving end instead of a God-serving means. Those who steward attention as means and not end stand tall and serve strong, knowing that all gifts come from God and can therefore draw attention to God.

John decreased so others could see the Lamb. John decreased so others could follow the One who preceded and surpassed him (John 1:30). John decreased so that the Messiah would be revealed in John’s lifetime. May our decrease likewise increase our generation’s view of Jesus.

Condensed from “Lent: He Must Increase, I Must Decrease”  by Alicia Britt Chole from faithgateway.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo
8 de marzo del 2019
iglesia-sunset-miami-kids-corner.jpg

Clase dominical

Nuestro currículo se titula Estudios Bíblicos para la Vida.  Las lecciones de esta semana son:

Pre-escolar (Español): El buen samaritano

Pre-escolar (Inglés): The Good Samaritan

Primaria (Todos): The Good Samaritan/El buen samaritano

Por favor, tómese el tiempo para mirar las páginas de actividad que sus hijos traen a casa. Encontrarás la historia bíblica, la lectura de las Escrituras sugeridas para la semana e instrucciones para descargar la aplicación Bible Studies for Life.

Nos encanta ver a tus hijos en la clase bíblica. Cuanto más frecuentemente vienen, más probabilidades tienen de entablar relaciones más sólidas con los otros niños y con los maestros. ¡Esperamos verte el domingo!

Reconocimentos

-Nicole Leon fue una buena ayudante.
-Aubrey Lopez fue una buena ayudante.
-Oliver Lowrance recordó decirle a su familia del plan de lectura de la Biblia diario.
-Samuel Henriquez hizó un gran trabajo en su proyecto de clase.
-Levi Parsard cumple años marzo 12.
-Levi Parsard dirigió los cantos de la clase.
-Maya Pino fue una gran ayudante.
-Katherine Ruiz participó en clase.
-Lyla Sensing dirigió los cantos de la clase.
-Dayleen Valdes trajó un regalo para Compassion International.
-Samuel Valladares hizó un gran trabajo en su proyecto de clase.
-Estos estudiantes en la clase Preescolar contestaron preguntas sobre la lección: Henry Lowrance, Levi Parsard, Maya Pino, y Lyla Sensing.
-Estos estudiantes en la clase de Kínder – 2do grado trabajaron como equipo: Giovanni Delisma, Oliver Lowrance, Aiden Martinez, Luke Parsard, Logan Sensing, y Weston Sensing.
-Estos estudiantes de la clase de 3ro – 5to grado leyeron de la Biblia: Jassiel Baez, Jedany Baez, Jonathan Delisma, y Dayleen Valdes.

Marque su calendario

Domingo
Clase Bíblica 

Miércoles
Club de Awana 

Marzo 10
3ro–5to Grado Picnic
Cambiar reloj

Marzo 23
Bar-B-Que

Marzo 27
NO AWANA durante Vacaciones de primavera

March 29
Noche de Alabanza

Marzo 31
Area Wide Singing y Noche de Familia


Para los padres

La tradición de la Cuaresma y el ayuno (o renunciar a algo) no es tradicional para la mayoría de los cristianos evangélicos, hay un creciente interés entre muchos creyentes en usar estas semanas antes de la Pascua para acercarse a Cristo, recordar su sacrificio y preparar nuestros corazones para celebrar ¡Su resurrección! En su popular libro 40 Días de Disminución, la autora cristiana Alicia Britt Chole nos invita a considerar la Cuaresma como el inicio de un tiempo de disminución, una forma diferente de ayunar. 40 Días de Disminución te invita a adelgazar tu vida para engrosar tu comunión con Dios.

Como escribe Chole, “nuestro enfoque es despejar nuestros corazones de las cosas que nos pesan y bloquean nuestra visión y la de otros de Jesús. Porque gran parte de la razón por la que estamos aquí en la tierra es para ver a Jesús y hacer que otros lo vean a través de nosotros ". Sé bendecido por este extracto exclusivo ...

*

"Es necesario que El crezca, y que yo disminuya". - Juan el Bautista (Juan 3:30)

La disminución es una necesidad espiritual. Juan el Bautista fue el primero entre los seguidores de Jesús en captar su poder contracultural. La comprensión de Juan de "menos es más" fue espiritualmente profunda. Gabriel había anunciado el llamado a la vida de Juan a Zacarías antes de que Juan fuera concebido: Juan fue el que "en el espíritu y poder de Elías. . . [prepararía] un pueblo dispuesto para el Señor” (Lucas 1:17).

En muchos sentidos, Juan vivió un estilo de vida de Cuaresma los 365 días del año. Su dieta era estrecha, sus posesiones eran mínimas y su enfoque era eterno. Pero la disminución para Juan fue menos sobre sus posesiones y más sobre la atención. Su anhelo era atraer la atención y la lealtad de su generación hacia el Mesías. Desde la perspectiva de Juan, el verdadero valor de las personas verlo a él era que la gente estaría en posición de ver a través de él y mirar a Jesús. Al disminuir voluntariamente, Juan aumentó la visión de otros sobre el Salvador.

La atención no es innatamente mala. Se convierte en algo malo cuando se usa como un fin egoísta en lugar de un medio para servir a Dios. Aquellos que dirigen la atención como un medio y no como un final están de pie y sirven fuerte, sabiendo que todos los dones vienen de Dios y, por lo tanto, pueden llamar la atención hacia Dios.

Juan disminuyó para que otros pudieran ver el Cordero. Juan disminuyó para que otros pudieran seguir a Aquel que lo precedió y superó (Juan 1:30). Juan disminuyó para que el Mesías se revelara en la vida de Juan. Que nuestra disminución también incremente la visión de nuestra generación de Jesús.

Condensado de " Cuaresma: Él debe aumentar, debo disminuir" por Lee Strobel de faithgateway.com.

EspañolVanessa Pardo
March 1st, 2019
sunset-church-kids-corner-weekly.jpg

Sunday Bible Class

Our curriculum is Bible Studies for Life.  The lessons scheduled for this week are:

Spanish Preschool: Cuatro amigos que ayudaron

English Preschool: Four Friends Helped

School Age: Four Friends Helped

Please take the time to look at the Activity Pages that your children bring home.  You will find the Bible story, suggested Scripture reading for the week, and instructions for how to download the Bible Studies for Life app.

We love seeing your children in Bible class.  The more frequently they come, the more likely they are to build stronger relationships with the other children and with the teachers.  We look forward to seeing you on Sunday!

Recognition

-Cody Carroll showed kindness in class.
-Brenda Emokah showed kindness to a younger classmate.
-Sofia Gonzalez participated in class.
-Samuel Valladares showed kindness in class.
-In the Preschool Class there was good participation from Brenda Emokah, Guillermo Lameda, Henry Lowrance, Samuel Marin, Katherine Moran, Samantha Moran, Levi Parsard, Maya Pino, Lyla Sensing, Angela Solorzano, and Samuel Valladares.
-In the Kindergarten-2nd Grade Class there was good participation from Jacob Bergman, Vanessa Emokah, Aubrey Lopez, Oliver Lowrance, Luke Parsard, Logan Sensing, and Weston Sensing.
-In the 3rd-5th Grade Class Jassiel Baez, Jedany Baez, and Caleb Bergman read from the Bible.

Mark Your Calendar

Sundays
Bible Class

Wednesdays
Awana Club 

March 10
3rd-5th Grade Picnic
Spring Forward

 March 23
Bar-B-Que

 March 27
NO AWANA during Spring Break

March 29
Noche de Alabanza

March 31
Area Wide Singing and Family Night


For Parents

I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge — that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. — Ephesians 3:17-19

Most Christians understand God’s love on a grand scale. Growing up, we learned from John 3:16 that “God so loved the world” — and He does. He loves all people and He demonstrated that love by sending Jesus to die for us (Romans 5:8).

For many of us it’s easier to comprehend and accept this grand-scale love than it is to grasp the fact that He loves us as individuals. He loves you. He loves me.

“Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so,” says the Sunday school song you may have learned growing up. But have you ever let that really soak in?

It’s an age-old exercise, but sometimes it helps just to take a verse like John 3:16 and personalize it. Put your name in place of the broader terms like “the world.” Try it now, preferably out loud, and include verse 17 at the same time:

For God so loved [my name] that He gave His one and only Son, that [if I believe in him, then I] shall not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn [me], but to save [me] through Him.

Think about that. The eternal, almighty, all-knowing Author of the universe loved you and me enough to sacrifice His very own Son in order to pay the penalty we owed for our sin and to open the door of Heaven to us. We are truly loved in ways that go beyond words! Or, as today’s passage puts it, in a way that “surpasses knowledge.”

In fact, let’s take those verses and personalize them as well:

I pray that [I], being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge — that [I] may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. — Ephesians 3:17-19

Moment of Truth:

God is not just the Creator of the universe; He’s the One who lovingly knit you together in your mother’s womb. He’s not just the Redeemer of humankind; He’s the lover of your soul who came in the person of Christ to pay your ransom and adopt you into His family. “Yes, Jesus loves [your name]!”

Condensed from “God’s Personal Love”  by Lee Strobel from faithgateway.com.  

EnglishVanessa Pardo